CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR TAX & FINANCIAL PROFESSIONALS

50 Ways to Lose Your License

Icon_Webcast
Webcast
Icon_Level
Basic
Credits
CPE Credits
2 Credits: Regulatory Ethics

Course Description

Circular 230 is the common term for Title 31 Code of Federal Regulations, Subtitle A, Part 10. Circular 230 provides the rules governing practice before the Internal Revenue Service. This regulation explains, and expands on, Title 31 USC §330. This section is what gives the Secretary of the Treasury the authority to regulate those who practice before the IRS.

§330 (a) Subject to section 500 of title 5, the Secretary of the Treasury may—

  1. regulate the practice of representatives of persons before the Department of
    the Treasury; and
  2. before admitting a representative to practice, require that the representative demonstrate—
    1. good character;
    2. good reputation;
    3. necessary qualifications to enable the representative to provide to persons valuable service; and
    4. competency to advise and assist persons in presenting their cases.

Treasury Department has unsuccessfully attempted to regulate individuals and firms who prepare tax returns. In 2011 the IRS published regulations that were meant to protect consumers by regulating the tax preparation industry. The regulations were met with resistance, leading to class action suits against the IRS. A district court found in Loving, 920 F.Supp.2d 108 (D.D.C. 2013), aff’d 742 F.3d 103 (D.C. Cir. 2014) that the IRS did not have authority to regulate all preparers of income tax returns. The original regulations provided for required registration of all preparers and imposed continuing education requirements on all registrants. The Court found that the preparation of tax returns was not practice before the IRS. After the Loving decision the IRS backtracked by creating the Annual Filing Season Program. Participating in the program is voluntary. However, an individual who participates in the program consents to adhere to the practice requirements of Circular 230.

The most recent revision to Circular 230 was the publication of final regulations on June 12, 2014.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course you will be able to:

  • Understand the provisions of Circular 230 that can result in disciplinary actions against a practitioner.
  • Learn about expedited suspensions and the criteria for OPR to use them.
  • Laugh (hopefully) at some of the more outrageous actions of individuals that caused them to lose their license.

Course Specifics

Course ID
WC1420226090
Prerequisites

None

Advanced Preparation

None

Compliance information

NASBA Provider Number: 103220

Course Instructor

Mark Seid Headshot
Mark Seid, EA, CPA, USTCP

Mark F. Seid, EA, CPA has an active tax practice in Paso Robles, California specializing in small businesses and tax controversy. A National Tax Practice Institute graduate, Mark is admitted to practice before the U.S. Tax Court. He has served as an Internal Revenue Agent with the IRS in San Jose and San Luis Obispo, California, a state director for the California Society of Enrolled Agents, and the chair for the society’s Finance and Budget committee. He regularly presents courses to tax professionals on issues affecting small businesses.

50 Ways to Lose Your License

Expert Instructors
CPE CREDITS
2 Credits: Regulatory Ethics

$98.00


Webcasts are available for viewing Monday – Saturday, 8am – 10pm ET.

Icon_Webcast
Webcast
Icon_Level
Basic
Credits
CPE Credits
2 Credits: Regulatory Ethics

Course Description

Circular 230 is the common term for Title 31 Code of Federal Regulations, Subtitle A, Part 10. Circular 230 provides the rules governing practice before the Internal Revenue Service. This regulation explains, and expands on, Title 31 USC §330. This section is what gives the Secretary of the Treasury the authority to regulate those who practice before the IRS.

§330 (a) Subject to section 500 of title 5, the Secretary of the Treasury may—

  1. regulate the practice of representatives of persons before the Department of
    the Treasury; and
  2. before admitting a representative to practice, require that the representative demonstrate—
    1. good character;
    2. good reputation;
    3. necessary qualifications to enable the representative to provide to persons valuable service; and
    4. competency to advise and assist persons in presenting their cases.

Treasury Department has unsuccessfully attempted to regulate individuals and firms who prepare tax returns. In 2011 the IRS published regulations that were meant to protect consumers by regulating the tax preparation industry. The regulations were met with resistance, leading to class action suits against the IRS. A district court found in Loving, 920 F.Supp.2d 108 (D.D.C. 2013), aff’d 742 F.3d 103 (D.C. Cir. 2014) that the IRS did not have authority to regulate all preparers of income tax returns. The original regulations provided for required registration of all preparers and imposed continuing education requirements on all registrants. The Court found that the preparation of tax returns was not practice before the IRS. After the Loving decision the IRS backtracked by creating the Annual Filing Season Program. Participating in the program is voluntary. However, an individual who participates in the program consents to adhere to the practice requirements of Circular 230.

The most recent revision to Circular 230 was the publication of final regulations on June 12, 2014.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course you will be able to:

  • Understand the provisions of Circular 230 that can result in disciplinary actions against a practitioner.
  • Learn about expedited suspensions and the criteria for OPR to use them.
  • Laugh (hopefully) at some of the more outrageous actions of individuals that caused them to lose their license.

Course Specifics

Course ID
WC1420226090
Prerequisites

None

Advanced Preparation

None

Compliance information

NASBA Provider Number: 103220

Course Instructor

Mark Seid Headshot
Mark Seid, EA, CPA, USTCP

Mark F. Seid, EA, CPA has an active tax practice in Paso Robles, California specializing in small businesses and tax controversy. A National Tax Practice Institute graduate, Mark is admitted to practice before the U.S. Tax Court. He has served as an Internal Revenue Agent with the IRS in San Jose and San Luis Obispo, California, a state director for the California Society of Enrolled Agents, and the chair for the society’s Finance and Budget committee. He regularly presents courses to tax professionals on issues affecting small businesses.

50 Ways to Lose Your License

Expert Instructors
CPE CREDITS
2 Credits: Regulatory Ethics

Webcasts are available for viewing Monday – Saturday, 8am – 10pm ET.

$98.00